General blog

Rootlets abound in a brown chunk of mud held for the camera

Sneaking up on mud

by Becca Lensing In between mud sample collections, Uncle Clay Ching, of Hallelujah Hou fishing on Molokaʻi, gave us a crash course on throw net fishing on one of the largest fringing reef flats in the world. He taught us ...
Bacteroides: The clingy bacteria that mammals just can’t shake

Bacteroides: The clingy bacteria that mammals just can’t shake

by Nicolas VanderzylEvery parent knows the feeling: sneaking away to the restroom, yearning for a few minutes to yourself, only to be interrupted in seconds by light knocks and fifty questions. But alas, even if you aren’t a parent, you ...
Student with a concentrated look bites on her tongue as she works on an object with a screwdriver

Treating climate anxiety with action

by Devynn Wulstein (she/her)Imagine flipping to the back synopsis of a random book in the bookstore and reading this: "The year is 2021. A pandemic has swept across the globe, leaving a tidal wave of scientific denial, and fueling greater ...
Close up of small round baby fish with large eyes

Feed me! How examining larval diets could be a game-changer for aquaculture

by Cassie Kaʻapu-LyonsNext time you visit your local pet store, take a look at the fishes. Many of the freshwater fishes available to you have been bred and raised in captivity, but most marine fishes have been harvested from the ...
Sandy coastal water bounded by rocks is rippled by upwelling groundwater

Picking apart “dirty” groundwater sources

by Casey McKenzieWhen discussing contamination of water resources, our minds likely first jump to imagining polluted creeks and lakes, or rivers that lead to the ocean. We typically picture in our minds the bodies of water that are visible to ...
Scenic view looking down across the coastline and buildings of Waikiki, with the Waiʻanae Mountains in the background

Science and design collide: Benefits of interdisciplinary research and collaboration

by Jojo Briones Those concerned about the future of Waikīkī span many perspectives: government officials, architects, community leaders, engineers, hotel managers, educators, scientists, and residents. Representatives from all these backgrounds came together recently for a virtual community outreach series to ...
Shallow coastal waters in a rocky baylet show patterns of upwelling water

Using, valuing, and caring for groundwater dependent ecosystems in Kona, Hawaiʻi

by Veronica GibsonGroundwater is an important resource. This is especially true on the leeward Kona coast of Hawaiʻi Island, where groundwater is the primary source of water for both humans and ecosystems. Virtually no surface runoff or perennial streams exist ...
In the zone: How salinity research can aid native Hawaiian plants

In the zone: How salinity research can aid native Hawaiian plants

by Anna H McCormickThe islands of Hawaiʻi are approximately 2,000 miles from the nearest continental landmass, making them some of the most isolated islands in the world. There are approximately 1,400 plant taxa that are considered native, with 90 percent ...
A crowded beach scene with beach goers, umbrellas, and even a boat, with sparkling blue-green water in the background

Must like long walks on the beach

Must like long walks on the beach by Marcus PengA day of surveying starts with arriving in Waikīkī early in the morning. As I sit down at the Starbucks Reserve store with a coffee, I start to plan out the ...
Hand written notes border an overhead image of buildings in Waikiki

An Architect’s Toolkit: Waikiki and Future Sea-level Rise

by Ireland R. CastilloAs a budding architect, my tools of preference include some paper, pencils, pens of varying thicknesses, and the most high-tech tool, my ipad which condenses all the previous tools into one. But, even more important than any ...