Hawai‘i Sea Grant Opportunities

NATIONAL SEA GRANT INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT AND JOBS ACT (IIJA)
Marine Debris Challenge Competition

Important Due Dates:

July 29, 2022, 12:00PM (noon) HST: Completed Partnership form due to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant

August 9, 2022, 8:59PM HST: Letters of Intent (LOI) will be sent to the National Sea Grant Office by Hawaiʻi Sea Grant

September 16, 2022, 5:00PM HST: Full Proposals due to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant

September 30, 2022, 8:59PM HST: Full Proposals submitted by Hawaiʻi Sea Grant to grants.gov

National Sea Grant anticipates having approximately $16,000,000 to fund approximately 5-12 projects of up to three years’ duration. We expect the average project size will be between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000; however, applications may request up to $3,000,000 in federal funds addressing the program priorities. The anticipated start date is January 1, 2023, with projects to be completed by December 31, 2025.

For complete information please review the Notice of Federal Funding Opportunity: NOAA-OAR-SG-2022-2007452

All applicants must complete a Partnership form by July 29, 2022 by 12:00PM (noon) HST to help coordinate proposals with Hawaiʻi Sea Grant extension and communication personnel. See more details below. 

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY OVERVIEW

The National Sea Grant College Program was enacted by the U.S. Congress in 1966 (amended in 2020, Public Law 116-221) to support leveraged federal and state partnerships that harness the intellectual capacity of the nation’s universities and research institutions to solve problems and generate opportunities in coastal communities.

Subject to the availability of funding in fiscal years 2022 and 2023, Sea Grant anticipates approximately $16,000,000 will be available to support innovative, transformational research to application (R2A) projects that will address the prevention and/or removal of marine debris, with award periods of three years. “Research to application” or R2A refers to research and development projects that transition into tangible outcomes and outputs. Examples include (but are not limited to) new prototypes, products, processes, or tools.

Proposals may address (but are not limited to) innovative interception and/or removal technologies, reusable systems, microplastics, and/or nanoplastics. Proposals are sought that will build upon and extend existing knowledge and efforts related to marine debris; support broad, non-proprietary, and innovative research to address critical gaps with respect to marine debris; make that information available to communities and stakeholders; include Sea Grant education and extension professionals, community representatives, government, academic, non- governmental, and industry partners, as appropriate; and proactively incorporate principles of diversity, equity, inclusion, justice, and accessibility at every level of the work.

Proposals must include funding for Sea Grant education and/or extension personnel as collaborators. Community, government, academic, non-government, and industry stakeholder participation/involvement in projects is strongly encouraged. Applications DO NOT require the standard 50% non-federal match for Sea Grant projects. However, applicants are strongly encouraged to combine NOAA federal funding with formal matching contributions and informal leverage from a broad range of sources in the public and private sectors. To this end, applicants should note that cost sharing and leverage of other funds is an element considered in the evaluation criteria.

Fully integrated teams of collaborators noted above must submit proposals with and through a Sea Grant program (Sea Grant Colleges, Institutions, or Coherent Area Programs). A Sea Grant program may submit or participate in more than one proposal. Collaborations among Sea Grant programs are encouraged, as appropriate. Please note that it is not a requirement that investigators, including the PI, are part of a Sea Grant program. Contact information for each program can be found at https://seagrant.noaa.gov/About. All 34 Sea Grant programs are eligible to serve as partners and to submit applications. If you need further assistance in identifying a program to partner with please contact the National Sea Grant Office via email at oar.sg.marine-debris@noaa.gov.

Full details on requirements for submitting to this funding opportunity are detailed in the full announcement (NOAA-OAR-SG-2022-2007452). Additional guidance and tips on how best to prepare an application are provided in the Sea Grant General Application Guide available at (https://seagrant.noaa.gov/Portals/1/Guidance/SeaGrantGeneralApplicationGuide.pdf).

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

To strengthen efforts in prevention and mitigation, the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), has directed NOAA’s National Sea Grant College Program to execute $50.0 million over five years for the prevention and removal of marine debris. While plastics are a key focus, this work will also address other relevant types of marine debris, as appropriate. This work will complement broader NOAA efforts, particularly, the National Ocean Service’s Marine Debris Program, focused on active removal, cleanup, mitigation, and prevention of marine debris. Each Sea Grant program will determine and prioritize local needs and research-driven solutions that fully integrate the needs of historically underserved communities as defined by Executive Order 13985 (Section 2(b)).

This competition will support innovative research to application (R2A) projects that will address the prevention and/or removal of marine debris and provide the potential for transformational behavior change. “Research to application” or R2A refers to research that transitions into tangible outputs. Example outputs include (but are not limited to) inventive prototypes, commercial products, specialized services, or cutting-edge tools. Big ideas and risk taking are encouraged. Planning and capacity building activities are allowed but must accompany subsequent implementation activities; the end result of these projects cannot be solely academic or non-tangible outputs (e.g., scientific publications, awareness/training). A strong application will clearly outline how the project will produce new and effective deliverables that change the landscape for marine debris prevention and/or removal. Projects will communicate these outputs to the public (communities, stakeholders, industry, etc.) with the aim of addressing critical gaps with respect to marine debris. Proposals may address (but are not limited to) innovative interception and/or removal technologies, reusable systems, microplastics, and/or nanoplastics. See Section I.B. Program Priorities for more details.

Competitive projects will include funding for Sea Grant education and extension professionals and display a diverse coalition of partners including (but not limited to) community representatives, stakeholder groups, and industry collaborators. Projects will proactively incorporate principles of diversity, equity, inclusion, justice, and accessibility at every level of the work.

Principal investigators of proposals selected for funding will be required to participate in annual National Sea Grant Marine Debris meetings to share results of work conducted, discuss challenges, synthesize outputs, and to plan next steps. Cost sharing, leveraged funds, and in-kind support will make projects more competitive. Applicants are strongly encouraged to combine NOAA federal funding with formal matching contributions and informal leverage from a broad range of sources in the public and private sectors. To this end, applicants should note that cost sharing and leverage of other funds is an element considered in the evaluation criteria.

PROGRAM PRIORITIES

This competition will fund proposals that invest in transformative marine debris research to application (R2A) projects that will show clear and measurable outcomes and applications for marine debris prevention and removal. Projects should have a clear pathway for research or ideas to transition into application, operation, or commercialization by relevant stakeholders, and Marihave the potential for long-term utilization. Proposal topics should support priorities laid out in relevant documents, such as the NAS 2021 report, relevant regional marine debris action plans (https://marinedebris.noaa.gov/emergency-response-guides-and- regional-action-plans#pub-term-145), strategic plans, and/or other documents, such as:

  • Development of innovative removal and/or interception technologies and reusable systems that prevent debris from entering the marine environment.
  • Innovative solutions for mitigation and clean-up of derelict fishing gear and ghost gear.
  • Microplastics and nanoplastics
    • Mitigation of the effects of microplastics and nanoplastics on human health and marine biota (including residence time, digestive degradation, and ingestion and excretion rates).
    • Detection methods for microplastics and nanoplastics in products, organisms, and/or the environment.
    • Improvements to wastewater treatment that eliminate microplastics and nanoplastics from effluent and sludge.
    • Mitigation of the impacts of plastics in food webs (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine 2021. Reckoning with the U.S. Role in Global Ocean Plastic Waste).

Proposed projects should also:

  1. Be responsive to state, local, and regional needs within a national framework (see Hawaiʻi priorities below).
  2. Leverage existing Sea Grant and partner investments and capacities.
  3. Embed diversity, equity, inclusion, justice, and accessibility (DEIJA) fully into the effort.
  4. Show how this work will be enhanced through partnerships, including collaboration among Sea Grant programs, with the NOAA Marine Debris Program, and with other appropriate partners.

Proposals should address any of the priorities in this section along with the four principles above to be acceptable for this opportunity.

AWARD INFORMATION

Subject to the availability of funding, this announcement describes how eligible applicants should apply for the National Sea Grant IIJA Marine Debris Challenge Competition. Sea Grant anticipates having approximately $16,000,000 to fund approximately 5-12 projects of up to three years’ duration. We expect the average project size will be between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000; however, applications may request up to $3,000,000 in federal funds addressing the program priorities.

There is no guarantee that funds will be available to make awards, or that any application will be selected for funding. If an applicant incurs any costs prior to receiving an award agreement signed by an authorized NOAA official, it does so at its own risk of not being selected or of these costs not being included in a subsequent award. NOAA and DOC will not be responsible for any incurred project costs if a project fails to receive full funding.

The anticipated start date is January 1, 2023, with projects to be completed by December 31, 2025.

The funding instrument is a cooperative agreement to an eligible institution. A cooperative agreement is used when substantial involvement of the federal government during performance of the proposed work is anticipated. The nature of the substantial involvement includes strategic engagement with the National Sea Grant Marine Debris Team, support from National Sea Grant Communication efforts, and annual National Sea Grant Marine Debris meetings.

ELIGIBILITY

ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS

The following entities are eligible to submit to this opportunity: Sea Grant College Programs, Sea Grant Institutional Programs, and Sea Grant Coherent Area Programs. A Sea Grant program may submit or participate in more than one proposal.

Other interested entities must submit proposals in partnership with and through a relevant Sea Grant program. Please note that it is not a requirement that investigators, including the PI, are part of a Sea Grant program; however proposals must be submitted with and through a Sea Grant program. Hawaiʻi Sea Grant requires prospective collaborators to complete a partnership form no later than 12PM (noon) HST on July 29, 2022 to help coordinate proposals with Hawaiʻi Sea Grant extension and communication personnel. 

Federal agencies and their personnel are not permitted to receive federal funding under this competition; however, federal scientists and other employees can serve as uncompensated partners or co-Principal Investigators on applications. Federal labs and offices can also make available specialized expertise, facilities, or equipment to applicants but cannot be compensated under this competition for their use.

The National Sea Grant College Program champions diversity, equity, inclusion, justice, and accessibility (DEIJA) by recruiting, retaining, and preparing a diverse workforce, and proactively engaging and serving the diverse populations of coastal communities. Sea Grant is committed to building inclusive research, extension, communication, and education programs that serve people with unique backgrounds, circumstances, needs, perspectives, and ways of thinking. We encourage applicants of all ages, races, ethnicities, national origins, gender identities, sexual orientations, disabilities, cultures, religions, citizenship types, marital statuses, education levels, job classifications, veteran status types, income, and socioeconomic status types to apply for this opportunity.

COST SHARING OR MATCHING REQUIREMENT

Standard Sea Grant cost sharing is waived for this call. However, cost sharing, leveraged funds, and in-kind support will make projects more competitive. Applicants are strongly encouraged to combine NOAA federal funding with formal matching contributions and informal leverage from a broad range of sources in the public and private sectors. Community, government, academic, non-government, and industry stakeholder participation/involvement in projects is strongly encouraged through cost sharing, leveraged funds, and/or in-kind match.

SUBMISSION INFORMATION

Full details on requirements for submitting to this funding opportunity are detailed in the full announcement (NOAA-OAR-SG-2022-2007452). Additional guidance and tips on how best to prepare an application are provided in the Sea Grant General Application Guide available at (https://seagrant.noaa.gov/Portals/1/Guidance/SeaGrantGeneralApplicationGuide.pdf).

PARTNERSHIP FORM

All applicants must complete a partnership form to help coordinate proposals with Hawaiʻi Sea Grant extension and communication personnel. Applicants will be asked to provide an overview of their idea(s) for proposals to help our staff understand your interests. You can submit this form multiple times for separate proposal ideas. After you submit the form, our team will follow-up with you directly. In order to develop meaningful collaboration and proposals, our team anticipates that only a small number of proposed ideas will move forward to the LOI and full proposal stage.

Those interested in applying need to complete this partnership form as soon as possible, and no later than 12:00 PM (noon) HST on July 29, 2022. Due to the short timeline and high interest, Hawaiʻi Sea Grant cannot consider requests for partnership outside of submissions via the partnership form by the specified deadline.

PARTNERSHIP FORM

LETTER OF INTENT

If Hawaiʻi Sea Grant staff would like to pursue a letter of intent (LOI), they will work directly with the applicant(s) to write and submit the LOI. LOIs must be sent by Hawaiʻi Sea Grant via email to the Competition Manager no later than 8:59PM HST on Tuesday, August 9, 2022.

FULL PROPOSAL

Working with Hawaiʻi Sea Grant staff, full proposals will be due to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant by 5:00PM HST on Friday, September 16, 2022. Hawaiʻi Sea Grant will then submit the full proposals to grants.gov by the deadline of 8:59PM HST on Friday, September 30, 2022.

CONTACTS

Questions about Partnership Form: donohuem@hawaii.edu

Questions about Budgets: elysehan@hawaii.edu

Questions about the Funding Opportunity: oar.sg.marine-debris@noaa.gov

APPLICATION RESOURCES

Notice of Funding Opportunity

Q&A for Marine Debris Funding Opportunities

2021 Hawaii Marine Debris Action Plan

Reckoning with the U.S. Role in Global Ocean Plastic Waste

Hawai’i Sea Grant Strategic Plan 2018-2023

Deadline to apply is Friday July 29, 2022 at 11:59 p.m. HST

In celebration of the University of Hawaiʻi Sea Grant College Program’s (Hawai‘i Sea Grant’s) 50th anniversary, we are seeking three local artists to collaborate with on a sci-art exhibit at Arts at Mark’s Garage, located in Honolulu, HI in November 2022. Each selected artist will be provided $2,000 and additional funds to create and develop artwork that creatively translates our work in 1) Healthy Coastal Ecosystems, 2) Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture, 3) Resilient Communities and Economies, and 4) Environmental Literacy and Workforce Development.

We welcome applications from artists of all media including (and not exclusive to) painting, illustration, sculpture, ceramics, music, digital, videography, clothing and textiles, photography, and many more!

Application Requirements:

  1. Cover Letter – Please submit a cover letter that describes your artistic process, how your artwork aligns with Hawaiʻi Sea Grant, and your own personal connection to coastal communities in Hawaiʻi.
  2. Curriculum vitae (cv) or resume (2-3 pages).
  3. Work samples – this can also include your professional website, social media (Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, TikTok), and/or links to previous projects.

Please submit your application packet to the Hawaiʻi Sea Grant assistant director for diversity and community engagement, Dr. Beth Lenz, at ealenz@hawaii.edu

CONTINUOUS

Please reply to Cindy Knapman, lknapman@hawaii.edu

Science writers specializing in coastal and ocean resource management and water resource management needed for Hawai‘i Sea Grant’s biannual magazine Ka Pili Kai, published by the University of Hawai‘i Sea Grant College Program, Honolulu, Hawai‘i. Must possess an understanding of Hawai‘i and Pacific Islands issues. It is helpful if the contractor is based in Hawai‘i or the Pacific Islands, but is not required.

Ka Pili Kai magazine communicates scientific knowledge to people of all ages who are interested in ocean and coastal management. It focuses on the topics such as water resources, coastal and climate science, sustainable coastal tourism, smart building and community design, marine education, and indigenous science, knowledge, and culture. The magazine is geared for ocean and coastal resource managers, policymakers, nongovernmental organizations such as environmental groups, and interested citizens. Please find a copy of our last issue HERE.

  1. The contractor will collect information on a pre-selected topic by interviewing scientists, resource managers, or cultural experts who are involved with the topic of interest.
  2. The contractor will be requested to write one or more of the following:
  3. 600-word profile on an individual
  4. 600-word story on a specific topic of interest that will be assigned
  5. 1,500-word summary of a selected book
  6. 2,000-2,500-word story on a specific topic of interest that will be assigned

The target audience includes policymakers, ocean and coastal resource professionals, and interested citizens. The articles should spark the reader’s interest by:

  1. Translating technical scientific information into layman’s terms.
  2. Providing context so the relevance of the information is readily apparent.
  3. Providing interesting quotes from the scientists and other interviewees.
  4. Craft a frame narrative so the article tells an interesting story and holds the reader’s
    attention.

The contractor will also:

  1. Obtain photos and/or figures from the featured scientist(s) or cultural experts related to the findings and write captions for each. Photos and figures should be provided electronically as individual files. Photos should be .jpg or .tiff files with a minimum resolution of 300 dots per inch (dpi).
  2. Provide managing editor with a preliminary draft for review and work with them to resolve any issues regarding clarity and accuracy.
  3. Submit the final draft electronically in Microsoft Word along with photos and figures to the managing editor within 3 weeks.

The contractor must have sufficient understanding of science and ocean and coastal management to translate complex scientific information and make it interesting and accessible to a broad audience.

How to apply:

To apply, please send a PDF of the following application materials to lknapman@hawaii.edu:

  •    Cover letter
  •    Resume or CV
  •    3 writing samples that demonstrate an ability to translate scientific information in a style that stimulates the interest of an educated audience.
  1. Potential contractors shall supply a lump sum bid for writing one or more of the articles described above.
  2. Contractor is paid per article following satisfactory submittal.
  3. The contractor does not own the copyright to any work or writing produced.

Email responses to: lknapman@hawaii.edu

Questions? Please contact Cindy Knapman, lknapman@hawaii.edu, (808) 956-7410

About the University of Hawai‘i Sea Grant College Program

Founded in 1968, the University of Hawaiʻi Sea Grant College Program (Hawai’i Sea Grant) is part of a national network of 33 programs that promote better understanding, conservation, and use of coastal resources. Hawai’i Sea Grant works in partnership with the University of Hawaiʻi’s prestigious School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to identify Hawaiʻi’s critical resource management issues and guide cutting-edge scientific research to address these challenges.

Hawai’i Sea Grant supports an innovative program of research, extension, education, and communication services directed to the improved understanding and stewardship of coastal and marine resources. Realizing the necessity of collaboration to address coastal resource issues, Hawai’i Sea Grant also provides links between academia, federal, state, and local government agencies, industries, and local community members.

2022 E. Gordon Grau Coastal and Marine Resource Management and Policy Fellowship Program
(2022 Grau Fellowship)

(CLOSED)

APPLICANS DUE: 5:00 pm HST on Friday, May 13, 2022

About the Fellowship

In recognition of Professor Emeritus E. Gordon Grau’s service of more than 14 years to the Sea Grant College Program at the University of Hawaiʻi (Hawaiʻi Sea Grant) and the national network of 34 Sea Grant College Programs nationwide, we have established the E. Gordon Grau Coastal and Marine Resource Management and Policy Fellowship Program (Grau Fellowship). Sponsored by Hawaiʻi Sea Grant, the Grau Fellowship provides a unique educational and work opportunity for post-graduate students who are interested in coastal and marine resource management and policy decisions affecting those resources in Hawaiʻi. Modeled after the highly successful John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program, the Grau Fellowship provides fellows an opportunity to acquire on-the-job experience in the planning, implementation and management of marine, coastal, and/or watershed resource policies and programs in Hawaiʻi. The program matches highly motivated and qualified recent graduates of graduate programs with hosts in state, federal, or municipal agencies and nonprofits in Hawaiʻi for a 2-year paid fellowship ($5,000.00 per month).

Eligibility

Graduate students at institutions of higher education in Hawaiʻi who complete their graduate degrees (Masters, Ph.D., or J.D) between May 1, 2021 and August 31, 2022 in fields related to conservation, management, public policy, planning, or law of marine and/or coastal resources are eligible and encouraged to apply. Additionally, applicants who graduated from a high school in Hawaiʻi and complete their graduate degrees between May 1, 2021 and August 31, 2022 in related disciplines as described above from accredited institutions of higher education outside of Hawaiʻi are encouraged to apply (e.g., students who graduated high school in Hawaiʻi and completed graduate degrees in California). Fellows must complete all degree requirements before starting the fellowship.

This Fellowship is open to both U.S. and non-U.S. citizens. If you are a prospective applicant who is a non-U.S. citizen please be in touch with Maya Walton, Hawaiʻi Sea Grant’s Assistant Director for Research and Fellowships (waltonm@hawaii.edu) to discuss .

Hawaiʻi Sea Grant is committed to increasing the workforce and its diversity in Hawaiʻi. Sea Grant embraces individuals of all ages, races, ethnicities, national origins, gender identities, sexual orientations, disabilities, cultures, religions, citizenship types, marital statuses, job classifications, veteran status types, and income, and socioeconomic status types. Hawaiʻi Sea Grant is committed to building inclusive research, extension, communication, and education programs that serve people with unique backgrounds, circumstances, needs, perspectives, and ways of thinking.

Stipend and Expenses

Each fellow will receive a $60,000/year stipend for the 2-year fellowship ($5,000/month). Fellows will be responsible for obtaining health insurance and for the tracking and allocation of state and federal taxes as appropriate. Possible travel associated with the fellowship may be covered by the host agency at the agency’s discretion.

Length of Assignment

The length of assignment is 2 years (24 months; non-renewable). The fellowship will begin September 1, 2022 and end August 31, 2024.

Application Process

A complete application will include:

1. Personal and academic curriculum vitae (two pages maximum, 12-point font)

  • Describes applicant’s experience in either marine/coastal/watershed/climate science, natural and cultural resource management, planning, public policy, and/or law.
  • Describes any honors, awards, and other recognition received by the applicant.
  • Shows that the applicant has interest in working with diverse communities.
  • Describes an applicant’s commitment to apply scientific expertise to serve society.
  • Describes an applicant’s prior leadership roles relevant to the career stage (e.g., student government, faculty committees, advisory committees, professional societies, community initiatives, etc.).

2.  A personal education and career goal statement (1,000 words maximum, 12-point font) that includes the following:

  • Emphasizes the applicant’s abilities, relevant background, and experience that may be helpful to one of the listed host offices and projects.
  • Describes what the applicant expects to gain from and contribute to the Grau Fellowship Program.
  • Describes the applicant’s specific preference in the potential host office(s) listed.
  • Describes the applicant’s long-term career goals and how the Grau Fellowship fits into their long-term career plans.

3. Copies of all undergraduate and graduate student transcripts. Unofficial copies will be accepted at time of application deadline with official transcripts due prior to finalizing awards.

4. Two letters of professional recommendation, including one from the student’s degree advisor. If no degree advisor exists, the faculty member who is most familiar with the applicant academically may be substituted. Letters will be received through eProjects. We encourage students to enter the names and emails of their letter writers in eProjects early in the application process.

5. Written documentation that a graduate degree has been completed or will be completed by August 31, 2022. For most students the copy of the transcript will show that the graduate degree has been conferred. For students who are graduating after Grau Fellowship applications are due in May 2022, we ask for a signed letter from the studentʻs advisor or department chair stating the student’s intended graduation date and what remains to be completed in their degree program before graduation.

How to Submit Application

Applications should be submitted via eProjects by 5:00 PM HST on Friday, May 13, 2022.

https://www.soest.hawaii.edu/eProjects/logn/logn_login.php (Note: upon first arrival at eProjects, if you do not already have an account, you will be asked to sign up and create a username and password). Students will be asked to submit the names and emails for their letter writers. Letters of recommendation will be submitted via eProjects directly from the letter writers. Late applications will not be considered.

Potential Host Offices for the 2022 Fellowship

WAI: Wastewater Alternatives & Innovations

WAI is a non-profit organization established in 2019. WAI’s mission is to help restore healthy watersheds, clean water, and resilient reefs by reducing the amount of sewage pollution from cesspools and failing septic systems. Currently, over 88,000 cesspools leach over 53 million gallons per day of untreated wastewater into the ground. Much of this leachate reaches groundwater and the ocean, causing pollution problems that impact drinking water, coastal waters, public health, and coral reefs. WAI’s vision for clean water motivates their work to help communities across Hawaiʻi to convert cesspools and introduce innovative systems that are more affordable, efficient, and better for the environment. The Grau Fellow at WAI will:

  1. Facilitate infrastructure projects on a single-family, community, and municipal level;
  2. Provide general technical expertise and support during and outside of meetings;
  3. Create, review, and present grant proposals, reports, and slide decks;
  4. Research environmental science, engineering, and financial and legal matters related to wastewater infrastructure;
  5. Manage and supervise interns and volunteers;
  6. Create and manage interactive GIS maps and outreach websites.

Desired skills for this fellow are:

  • Background in water management, water quality research, wastewater engineering, planning, water policy, science communication, or related fields.
  • Ability to learn and translate technical/scientific topics to non-technical audiences.
  • Ability to connect and communicate with various audiences (e.g., engineers, contractors, plumbers, electricians, etc.), including through public speaking.
  • Ability to work independently or in teams with diverse user groups, cultures, personalities, and perspectives.
  • Ability to coordinate and organize working groups and to facilitate meetings.
  • Ability to think critically, speak clearly, and write effectively.
  • Ability to use relevant software programs such as Autodesk AutoCAD and ArcGIS Online.

National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC)

The NDPTC is a national, congressionally-authorized center which works collaboratively to develop and deliver training and education on disaster preparedness, response, and recovery to governmental, tribal, territorial, not-for-profit, and private sector partners. NDPTC is a member of the National Domestic Preparedness Consortium (NDPC). The NDPTC actively engages with the University of Hawaiʻi, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and many other agencies and organizations in conducting research and developing training to support climate resilience, sustainability, and community resilience. The Grau Fellow at NDPTC will:

  1. Work with Rapid Integrated Damage Assessment (RIDA), a decision-support system used to conduct rapid, non-invasive damage assessment that integrates machine vision and learning with satellite/remote sensing imagery, crowdsourced media, and 360 Street View images and “perishable” data to classify structure types and levels of damage;
  2. Evaluate and test living shorelines and green strategies for improving community resilience that ties into an increasing national focus on climate resilient and green infrastructure;
  3. Develop curriculum for NDPTC’s training for university students, professionals, and communities on coastal planning and management, disaster recovery, and social equity.

Desired skills for this fellow are:

  • Background in public policy, engineering, urban planning, economics, social sciences, management, natural sciences, conservation, or related fields.
  • Knowledge of geospatial tools for planning and engineering activities.
  • Ability to collect, process, format, and work with quantitative and qualitative data.
  • Writing and verbal communication skills for audiences across management, education, and the public.
  • Understanding of relevant federal, state, and local policies and programs.
  • Knowledge of and familiarity with island communities.
  • Ability to learn and translate technical/scientific topics to non-technical audiences.
  • Ability to connect and communicate with various audiences.
  • Ability to work independently or in teams with diverse user groups, cultures, personalities, and perspectives.

Selection

Selection of finalists (2022 Grau Fellowship Cohort) will be made based on reviews of written application materials and interviews (in person, Zoom, or phone). Selection criteria include: academic ability, communication skills, diversity and appropriateness of academic background, clear articulation of career goals and how the fellowship fits in the student’s anticipated career path, additional qualifying experience, and letters of support.

Timeline

May 13, 2022 (5:00 PM HST):

Applications due via eProjects https://www.soest.hawaii.edu/eProjects/logn/logn_login

May 2022 (approximate):

Interviews for selection of finalists by Hawaiʻi Sea Grant. Finalists are notified of status.

September 1, 2022:

Fellowship begins (date can be negotiated between fellow and host agency).

Contact

For additional information, please contact:
Maya Walton
Assistant Director for Research and Fellowships
University of Hawai‘i Sea Grant College Program   waltonm@hawaii.edu; (808) 956-6992

Application Evaluation Criteria

1. Personal and academic curriculum vitae (35 percent).

For the Grau Fellowship Program, the personal and academic curriculum vitae is reviewed on the extent to which:

  • The applicant has relevant employment, volunteer, or extracurricular activities in academic, applied, research, administration, outreach, or policy positions that would be beneficial to one of the listed host offices;
  • The experience in the applicant’s area of expertise is appropriate to the career stage;
  • The applicant has received honors, awards, and other recognition;
  • The applicant has shown interest in working with diverse stakeholders;
  • The applicant’s experience demonstrates a commitment to apply scientific expertise to serve society;
  • The applicant’s experiences show prior leadership roles relevant to the career stage (e.g., student government, faculty committees, advisory committees, professional societies, community initiatives, etc.).
  • Records of publications and/or presentations (academic or nonacademic) are appropriate to the career stage, field, and institutional settings.

2. Personal education and career goal statement (40 percent).

For the Grau Fellowship program, the cover letter is reviewed on the extent to which the letter:

  • Is specific, direct, and concise while discussing what the applicant would bring to and gain from the Grau fellowship;
  • Clearly articulates the applicant’s career or life goal;
  • Demonstrates the applicant’s diverse personal and professional background;
  • Provides evidence of creative thinking, analytical skill, and/or indicates the applicant’s capacity and willingness to make connections between science and broader economic, social, and political issues;
  • Demonstrates the applicant’s ability to convey scientific knowledge in broader, nonscientific contexts.

3. Academic record (5 percent).

For the Grau Fellowship Program, the graduate and undergraduate transcripts are reviewed on the extent to which:

  • The education and experience in the applicant’s area of expertise are appropriate to the career stage and relevant to one of the listed host offices;
  • The applicant displays strength in academic performance and competitive course grades.

4. Letters of Recommendation (20 percent).

For the Grau Fellowship Program, the letters of recommendation are reviewed on the extent to which the letters:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the applicant and their abilities;
  • Speak to the leadership potential, confidence, maturity, and self direction of the applicant;
  • Provide evidence of the applicant’s willingness and flexibility to tackle issues beyond their area of expertise, and an openness and capacity to broaden their experience base;
  • Provide evidence of the applicant’s ability to convey scientific knowledge in broader, nonscientific contexts.

2022 Peter J. Rappa Fellowship (Rappa Fellowship)

CLOSED

APPLICATIONS DUE: March 15, 2022 at 5:00 PM HST
**Please remember to submit applications to eProjects
https://www.soest.hawaii.edu/eProjects/logn/logn_login.php

To continue the spirit and good work of long-time coastal sustainability extension agent Peter Joseph Rappa, the University of Hawai‘i Sea Grant College Program (Hawai‘i Sea Grant) created the Peter J. Rappa Fellowship (Rappa Fellowship) in memory of Mr. Rappa. Rappa Fellow(s) will be selected and involved in training and research to better understand aspects of coastal sustainability and resilience conducted within several of the Hawai‘i Sea Grant Centers of Excellence. Annually Rappa Fellows engage in projects that look into the natural, social, and built environments in Hawaiʻi and efforts to better manage issues that affect coastal community livability, sustainability and resilience. The Rappa Fellows will further their knowledge and understanding of sustainable coastal communities through research, extension, and community-based education in topics of coastal smart growth and community planning and their integration with hazard mitigation and climate change adaptation as well as cultural and traditional knowledge of Hawai‘i.

Potential projects for the 2022 Fellowship:
Education and Training for Realtors on Sea-level Rise

Last year, Hawaiʻi Governor David Ige signed into law Act 179 (Senate Bill 474), which requires a sea-level rise hazard exposure statement with the sale or transfer of vulnerable coastal property. This new legislation aims to improve awareness amongst prospective buyers of real estate regarding projected sea level rise impacts  (i.e., Sea Level Rise Exposure Area including passive inundation, erosion, and wave runup). This project will include background research on existing educational materials that Sea Grant programs nationwide have created for realtors and similar information-user groups to better understand coastal hazards, and an exploration of the transferability of preferred models to Hawaiʻi.

  • Complete background research on South Carolina Sea Grantʻs existing suite of courses and educational workshops that aim to educate real estate agents about properties in flood zones https://www.sccoastalinfo.org/courses/
  • Interview Sea Grant Extension Agents about best practices and lessons learned for creating educational materials for realtors and similar groups about coastal hazards.
  • Administer a small scale needs assessment with Hawaiʻi based realtors to gain more understanding about aspects of communicating sea-level rise risk that they still need technical assistance on.
  • Draft recommendations on potential next steps for creating educational materials for realtors on properties in the sea-level rise hazard exposure area.
  • Desirable skills and background include
    -Educational background and knowledge of sea-level rise, coastal, and flood hazards in Hawaiʻi
    -Experience translating technical information into educational materials
    -Good oral and written communication skills
    -Comfort with Zoom or other online communication

Enhancing Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Justice, and Accessibility (DEIJA) and Ethical Research

The Rappa Fellow would assist Hawaiʻi Sea Grant in developing and implementing goals to ensure Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Justice, and Accessibility (DEIJA) is incorporated as a cross-cutting priority in programmatic activities with a particular emphasis on analyzing ethical research practices in Hawaiian coastal and marine spaces.

  • Conduct a systematic literature review on coastal and marine research projects in the Hawaiian Islands to develop a broad picture of the types of research institutions involved in studying Hawaiian ecosystems and natural resources.This analysis will contribute to a deeper understanding of the “parachute science” dynamics at play in Hawaiʻi.
  • Support the review and analysis of the Hawaiʻi Sea Grant DEIJA survey conducted in 2022 to identify challenges and opportunities for Hawai’i Sea Grant to improve and align with the National Sea Grant Office efforts to strengthen the resilience of coastal communities.
  • Desirable skills and background include
    -Experience with large scale literature reviews and database management
    -Data visualization (i.e. developing charts, diagrams, and infographics for nonacademic audiences)
    -Familiarity with Hawaiian coastal and marine ecosystems and local conservation/stewardship networks
    -Demonstrated experience centering DEI issues
    -Comfort with Zoom or other online communication

Outreach and Communications Strategy for the Project ‘Envisioning In Situ Sea Level Rise Adaptation Strategies for a Densely Developed Coastal Community, Waikīkī’

The Rappa Fellow will focus on sharing the outcomes of the project ‘Envisioning In Situ Sea Level Rise Adaptation Strategies for a Densely Developed Coastal Community, Waikīkī’. The goal of this work is to create awareness of project outcomes among the general public, Waikīkī community, and interested stakeholders through the creation of an effective outreach and communications strategy.

The Rappa Fellow would:

  • Develop materials including a project summary, presentations, and complementary graphics for the Hawaiʻi Sea Grant website
  • Create a graphically interesting and coherent project profile (1-2 pages) to share with media outlets and interested stakeholders
  • Develop a list of relevant media outlets, their submission requirements (i.e., descriptive text/images/video), and current contact information
  • Pursue publication of project outcomes through relevant media outlets
  • Create social media posts to generate interest in the project’s outcomes. Partner with relevant organizations for cross-postings
  • Compile a ‘one-stop-shop’ of links to University of Hawaiʻi research related to Waikīkī and sea level rise adaptation for the project website
  • Explore public exhibition opportunities (both in person and virtual, COVID-19 dependent) and assist with the creation and execution of events as they arise
  • Other duties as assigned
  • Desirable skills and background include
    -Demonstrated communications and outreach experience
    -High level of comfort with public outreach and public speaking
    -Strong writing skills
    -Experience developing graphics and presentations (*please include at least two examples of original graphics in your application). Experience with graphic software (i.e. Photoshop, Illustrator) is preferred.
    -Knowledge of urban planning, sea level rise, and coastal processes

In addition to engaging fully in one of the listed potential projects above, the Rappa Fellow will also gain an understanding of the multifaceted operations of Hawai‘i Sea Grant through shadowing extension faculty and participating in activities as scheduling permits.

Requirements (Who is eligible?)

All full-time undergraduate or graduate students currently enrolled in an accredited university or community college are eligible to apply for the Rappa Fellowship

Locations:

The 2022 Rappa Fellowship may take place at one or a combination of the following locations.

  • Remote/Virtual
  • Hawai‘i Sea Grant office on the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa campus

Supervisor:

Maya Walton, Assistant Director for Research and Fellowships, University of Hawai‘i Sea Grant College Program

Length of Fellowship

  • 8-weeks full time (40 hour/week) summer fellowship
  • The fellowship will begin on Monday June 13, 2022 and will end on Friday, August 5, 2022

Stipend:

  • $6,000

Application components

  • Cover Letter (2 pages maximum)

The cover letter should describe your goals with an emphasis on what you as the applicant expect to gain from and contribute to the Rappa Fellowship program. The cover letter should also describe your specific interest or preference in the potential projects listed above and how your background and experience supports this project.

  • Resume (2 pages maximum)
  • Unofficial transcripts
  • The names, emails, and phone numbers of two references that the selection committee can contact

Application Submission:
Please submit via eProjects by March 15, 2022 at 5:00 PM HST

 https://www.soest.hawaii.edu/eProjects/logn/logn_login.php

Contact for Questions:
Maya Walton
Assistant Director for Research and Fellowships, University of Hawai‘i Sea Grant College Program
waltonm@hawaii.edu (808) 956-6992

Selection of finalists: Finalists will be selected by a review panel and will be contacted for interviews in April. Final decisions will be made by May and all applicants will be notified of a decision by this time.

2023 John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship

CLOSED

The call for student applications for the 2023 Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship is now open. Applications are due to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant via eProjects by Friday February 18, 2022.

Important dates and deadlines

  • Friday Feb. 18, 2022 5pm: applications due to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant via eProjects
  • Feb. 1, 2023: start date for Knauss Fellowship in Washington DC

About the Knauss Fellowship

The John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship provides a unique educational experience to graduate students who have an interest in ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes resources and in the national policy decisions affecting those resources. The program, which is sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Sea Grant Office, matches highly qualified graduate students with “hosts” in the legislative and executive branches of government located in the Washington, D.C. area, for a one-year paid fellowship.

Eligibility

The 2023 Knauss Fellowship begins February 1, 2023 and ends on January 31, 2024). Eligibility requirements include:

  • Enrolled towards a degree in a graduate program at any point between the onset of the 2021 Fall Term (quarter, trimester, semester, etc.) and February 18, 2022;
  • The student’s graduate degree program must be through an accredited institution of higher education in the United States or U.S. Territories;
  • Students are eligible regardless of nationality; domestic and international students at accredited U.S. institutions may apply;
  • Applicants must have an interest in ocean, coastal and Great Lakes resources and in the national policy decisions affecting those resources.

Stipend

Each fellow will receive a $66,500/year stipend for the 1-year fellowship. Fellows will be responsible for obtaining health insurance and for the tracking and allocation of state and federal taxes as appropriate. Possible travel associated with the fellowship may be covered by the host agency at the agency’s discretion.

Application Process

A complete application will include:

  1. Personal and academic curriculum vitae (two pages maximum, 12-point font)
  2. Personal education and career goal statement (1,500 words maximum, 12-point font)
  3. Listing of classes and/or plans for Spring 2022, Summer 2022, and Fall 2022 (one page max)
  4. Copies of all undergraduate and graduate student transcripts. Unofficial copies will be accepted at time of application deadline with official transcripts due prior to finalizing awards.
  5. Two letters of professional recommendation, including one from the student’s degree advisor. If no degree advisor exists, the faculty member who is most familiar with the applicant academically may be substituted. Letters will be received through eProjects.

For more detailed information on the application components please refer to this document: 2023-Knauss-Fellowship-Narrative-and-Instructions.pdf

How to Submit Application

Applications should be submitted via eProjects by 5:00 PM HST on Friday, February 18, 2022. https://www.soest.hawaii.edu/eProjects/logn/logn_login.php (Note: upon first arrival at eProjects, if you do not already have an account, you will be asked to sign up and create a username and password). Late applications will not be considered. Students will be asked to submit the names and emails for their letter writers. Letters of recommendation will be submitted via eProjects directly from the letter writers.

Contact

Interested students should discuss this fellowship with Hawaiʻi Sea Grant. Please contact Hawaiʻi Sea Grant Assistant Director for Research and Fellowships, Maya Walton at 808-956-6992 or waltonm@hawaii.edu. No more than six (6) applicants will be submitted to NOAA’s National Sea Grant Office according to criteria used in the national competition. The selection process and notification to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant will be completed by July of 2022.

Students from natural science, social science, and law graduate and professional programs are encouraged to apply. Any questions on the fellowship or application process can be directed to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant Program Leader, Maya Walton (waltonm@hawaii.edu, 808-956-6992).

For further details, visit: https://seagrant.noaa.gov/Knauss

Application instructions available (pdf) HERE.

2022 Coastal Management and Digital Coast Fellowships

CLOSED

Important dates and deadlines

  • Friday Jan 21, 2022: applications due to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant via eProjects
  • August 2022 start date for Coastal Management and Digital Coast Fellowship

The Coastal Management and Digital Coast Fellowships provide on-the-job education and training opportunities in coastal resource management and policy for postgraduate students. This is a two-year opportunity that offers a competitive salary, medical benefits, and relocation and travel expense reimbursement to selected fellows. The program matches postgraduate students with state coastal resource agencies and nonprofit organizations to work on projects proposed by the hosts and selected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

For further details, visit the Coastal Management and Digital Coast Fellowship websites at:

https://coast.noaa.gov/fellowship/coastalmanagement.html

https://coast.noaa.gov/fellowship/digitalcoast.html

A reminder that students are eligible to apply if they completed or plan to complete their master’s, doctoral, or professional degrees between August 1, 2020, and July 31, 2022. Any questions on the fellowship or application process can be directed to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant Assistant Director for Research and Fellowships, Maya Walton (waltonm@hawaii.edu, 808-956-6992).

Read full announcement HERE

2022 Population and Ecosystem Dynamics and Marine Resource Economics Fellowship

CLOSED

Applications due Jan. 27, 2022 5:00PM HST 

to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant via eProjects

The 2022 NMFS-Sea Grant Joint Fellowship Program in Population and Ecosystem Dynamics and Marine Resource Economics is a fisheries focused fellowship that places Ph.D. students in research-based fellowships that provide support for up to three years. The program is designed to fulfill workforce development needs identified by the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and since 1990, has provided opportunities for 144 Ph.D. students.

Applications are due to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant via eProjects by January 27, 2022. A reminder that students are eligible to apply if they are currently enrolled as PhD students. The award amount for the fellowship is $53,000 per year.

Students who are planning on submitting an application must meet with Hawaiʻi Sea Grant prior to the January 27, 2022 deadline. We encourage students to be in contact with our office early in the application process. Please contact the Hawaiʻi Sea Grant office to arrange meetings (uhsg@hawaii.edu, 808-956-7031). Any questions on the fellowship or application process can be directed to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant Assistant Director for Research and Fellowships, Maya Walton (waltonm@hawaii.edu, 808-956-6992).

For more info

(CLOSED)

Hawai’i Sea Grant is seeking a University of Hawai’i graduate student intern.
Student applicants must have completed a bachelors degree and be able to perform interviews and other tasks independently. Excellent writing and communications skills required, including the ability to write articles and press releases with moderate supervision. Must be able to convey complex scientific information to non-scientific audiences. Knowledge of graphic design and website development software desirable but not required. Communications or science background preferred.

Duties include interviewing researchers and extension faculty to write about their projects for various media products. Topics may include coral reefs, fisheries, sustainable development, marine mammals, coastal hazards, and community outreach. Must be willing to take high resolution photographs suitable to include in various media products. In addition, audio interviews will be conducted and synthesized for use on website, podcasts, etc.

This internship may also include other activities and duties as assigned in support of the Hawai’i Sea Grant Communications unit.

$17.35/hr
10-20 hours per week

To apply, log in to the Campus Student Employment website: https://sece.its.hawaii.edu/sece and search for position 78259-A5

Application review begins May 1, 2022. Position open until filled.

HOST OFFICE PROPOSALS for the 2022 Grau Fellowship (CLOSED)
E. Gordon Grau Coastal and Marine Resource Management Fellowship Program (Grau Fellowship)

Applications due March 1, 2022 5:00PM HST to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant via email to waltonm@hawaii.edu

About the Fellowship 

In recognition of Professor Emeritus E. Gordon Grau’s service of more than 14 years to the Sea Grant College Program at the University of Hawaiʻi (Hawaiʻi Sea Grant) and the national network of 34 Sea Grant College Programs nationwide, we have established the E. Gordon Grau Coastal and Marine Resource Management Fellowship Program (Grau Fellowship). This fellowship provides a unique degree-to-work experience for post-graduate students who have an interest in ocean and coastal resources in the state of Hawaiʻi and the management and policy decisions affecting those resources.

Sponsored by Hawaiʻi Sea Grant, the Grau Fellowship provides a unique educational and work opportunity for post-graduate students who are interested in coastal and marine resource management and policy decisions affecting those resources in Hawaiʻi. Modeled after the highly successful John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program, the Grau Fellowship provides fellows an opportunity to acquire hands-on experience in the planning, implementation, and management of marine, coastal, and/or watershed resource policies and programs in Hawaiʻi. The program matches highly motivated and qualified recent master’s, JD, and PhD recipients with hosts in state, federal or municipal agencies and nonprofits in Hawaiʻi for a 2-year paid fellowship.

Host Office Responsibilities 

Prospective hosts will provide an educational opportunity to fellows who will, in turn, provide substantial professional contributions to the office. Hosts are expected to supervise, mentor and provide opportunities for fellows to be involved in critical issues that support the fellow’s professional and educational goals. The fellow will be expected to engage with the host office and work on-site and with other staff and/or leadership, as appropriate.

Fellowship applications are submitted to Hawaiʻi Sea Grant and screened for appropriate academic background, employment history, career and education goals, community and extracurricular activities, interest in the fellowship, and for personal characteristics such as initiative, adaptability, and strong communication and analytical skills.

Prospective hosts are expected to contribute $46,000 per year of the costs to support a fellow ($92,000 over two years). Sea Grant will administer the monthly stipend payments for each fellow.

Budget

Hosts are expected to contribute $46,000/year towards total costs of the fellowship award. The fellowship is cost-shared with Hawaiʻi Sea Grant. Fellows receive a stipend of $5,000/month. Once hosts are confirmed, they are expected to work with Hawaiʻi Sea Grant to put into place a memorandum of agreement or a contract for each fellowship award prior to the start of fellowships in Fall 2022. Fellows are NOT ALLOWED to start the fellowship until the funding agreement is completed.

Length of Assignment

The length of assignment is 2 years (24 months; non-renewable). The fellowship will begin September 1, 2022 and end August 31, 2024. In some cases the start date can be negotiated to an August 1, 2022 start.

Host Office Application Process

The Grau Fellowship is open for participation by municipal, state, and federal agencies in Hawaiʻi, as well as Hawaiʻi based nonprofits that work on coastal or marine research, policy, or management.

A host office application should include the following information in two pages or less:

  1. Host office name and location
  2. Name of fellowship mentor/supervisor and contact information
  3. Position description (not to exceed two pages, single spaced)
  • The description should include a short summary and mission statement outlining the overall work of the office.
  • The description should also outline the specific projects that the fellow will work on, percentage of total work time dedicated to each project, and the desired skill sets and areas of expertise that the fellow should possess.
  • If selected as a participating host, this description will be made available and submitted to prospective fellowship applicants.

How to Submit Application 

Host office applications should be submitted via email to Maya Walton (waltonm@hawaii.edu) by 5:00 PM HST on March 1, 2022. Late applications will not be considered.

Host Office Selection

Acceptance of a host office application will be based on the following criteria:

  1. The perceived quality of the fellowship opportunity.
  2. The level of educational benefit for the fellow.
  3. The host office’s previous experience working with interns, fellows, or other mentoring/educational programs.
  4. Verification of available funds to meet host office financial commitment for the Grau Fellowship. Hosts are required to provide $46,000/year (or $92,000 over the two year fellowship) towards total costs of the fellowship award.

Selection of Fellow

Final selection of the Grau Fellow will be made by Hawaiʻi Sea Grant. Official offer of the Grau Fellowship to the selected applicant will also be made by Hawaiʻi Sea Grant.

Contact 

For additional information about the Grau Fellowship program, please contact: Maya Walton, Assistant Director for Research and Fellowships University of Hawai‘i Sea Grant College Program waltonm@hawaii.edu (808) 956-6992

Examples of Grau Fellow Host Offices

For examples of current and former host offices for the Grau Fellowship please visit https://seagrant.soest.hawaii.edu/directory/grau-fellows/

Hawai‘i Sea Grant supports a multidisciplinary, integrated program of applied research, outreach, and education addressing marine and coastal issues of public concern. Information generated by Hawai‘i Sea Grant-funded research reaches stakeholders via Hawai‘i Sea Grant extension, education, and communications activities in Hawai‘i and via the national network.

Please read more on the Hawai’i Sea Grant Request for Proposals page.