Fourth Edition coming soon!

The Homeowner’s Handbook provides useful tips regarding readiness for natural hazards that may affect Hawaii. The Fourth Edition is in preparation but until it is published, the reader can go to the updated Third Edition (Version 3.2) to get the latest information on preparation.

What’s New in 3.2

Shelter-in-Place Table – The State and counties no longer keep a list of active public hurricane shelters as the status is updated frequently. Only go to a public hurricane shelter if you hear on TV and radio that it is officially open. A better option may be to shelter in place if: (i) a house has no risk of flooding, (ii) is outside a hurricane storm surge zone, and (iii) is strong enough for the wind. The Shelter-in-Place Table with Instructions is located in Appendix A of the Homeowner’s Handbook Version 3.2.

Hurricane and Earthquake Retrofits – With the 2018 Hurricane Season, and the recent volcanic and earthquake activity on the Big Island, new retrofit measures are possible that address these hazards. Almost every house can be strengthened by tying the roof to the foundation (continuous load path) that reduces the risk of damage from earthquakes and hurricane winds.

For Single Wall Houses on “Tofu Blocks” – See: (i) 2009 Post and Pier Seismic Retrofits Report; (ii) Demonstration of Post and Pier Retrofit with New Connectors; and (iii) Post-Demonstration Project Evaluation and Assessment. To see the benefits of a post and pier retrofit, view a video on the lab tests for Post and Pier Retrofit here (NOTE that some of the links in this 2009 video are no longer active). To Retrofit a Single Wall House with Hurricane Clips, see Part 4 of the Homeowner’s Handbook Version 3.2.

For Double Wall Houses, many were built without a load path (generally built before 1995 – see Part 4 for precise dates). The load path can be added with structural screws as a retrofit. Almost every single wall and double wall house can be strengthened.

Volcanoes, Wildfire, Drought, Climate Change – In addition to the four major hazards of hurricanes, flooding, earthquakes and floods, the new edition will cover volcanoes, wildfire, drought, and climate change. The volcano section is a story that is still being written.